Fonts can make or break a design. When used effectively, the right typeface can add extra weight to your titles and body text, infusing each letter with emotion. Sometimes, however, it’s easy to get in a design rut and keepusing the same fonts over and over. Even though I’m as big of a fan of Helvetica as everyone else, there are a lot of other options out there.

From eye-catching fonts designed for headlines to legible typefaces that work best for bold signage, below are examples of our 7 favorite go-to web fonts for Ceros experiences—all of which are free via Google Fonts. What are some of your favorite fonts? Be sure to let me know in the comments!

Roboto

Roboto

Source: Ceros + Contently / Content > Advertising

Why we love it: We use Roboto throughout our infographic with Contently since it’s a clean font that makes reading on a screen enjoyable. Touted as having a “dual nature” by Google, Roboto blends cheery, rounded letters with a crispness that helps it maintain its geometric structure.

Download Roboto Here

Lato

Lato

Source: Ceros

Why we love it: Lato is a favorite of ours and featured on our website because it’s approachable, yet stylish. Designed in 2010, Lato doesn’t follow contemporary typography trends, but maintains a sleek aesthetic. Elegant and sharp Lato is described by its creator Łukasz Dziedzic as “Male and female, serious but friendly. With the feeling of the Summer.”

Download Lato Here

Playfair Display

Playfair Display

Source: Tully

Why we love it: Tully uses playfair display in their interactive guide to emphasize quotes from their travel designers. Eclectic and bold, Playfair Display is an energetic, playful font that has its roots in the Age of Enlightenment. Its soft, curved letterforms make for a fun aesthetic, resembling the writing you might achieve using a quill. Because it’s such an attention-getter, Playfair Display is typically used for titling and headlines.

Download Here

Raleway

Raleway

Source: Skyword

Why we love it: Skyword uses the simple and dependable Raleway throughout their Interactive Storytelling Basics infographic. Raleway is an elegant font with warm details that make it appropriate for both titling and body text. A member of the sans serif typeface family, Raleway is accessible and fun to read.

Download Here

Roboto Condensed

Roboto Condensed

Source: Bloomberg

Why we love it: If you’re a fan of Roboto, but would prefer a sleeker, narrower font perhaps Roboto Condensed is a good choice. Bloomberg uses this font in their infographic, maintaining the same cheery, rounded letters but creating a much elegant aesthetic.

Download Here

Teko

Teko

Source: Crowdstrike

Why we love it: Blocky, squat, and a little robotic-feeling, Teko is primarily used for headlines and titling. Crowdstrike uses Teko to add emphasis to the headlines in their interactive infographic above. A solid choice when you want to make a statement, Teko is a fun typeface that captures readers’ attention with its blunt letterforms.

Download Here

Karla

Karla

Source: Crowdstrike

Why we love it: Karla is simple, warm, and feminine. Refined and inviting, Karla is a fluid typeface that engages readers. It also pairs well with a number of other fonts (including Teko, as seen in Crowdstrike’s infographic), making it most appropriate as a font for body text.

Download Here

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